At a loss – Blog No. 13

Money

22.02.2016

When you hear the words ‘at a loss’ tossed around, remember that the phrase need not be interpreted negatively.  The statement indicates that in order for whomever it is to ‘be at a loss’ they have come to realise that prior to their now they had something of great value that they no longer have – and will not get again.  At least these people have the good grace to recognise their catastrophic failure to hold on to whatever that ‘thing’ of value was.  This is helpful because by facing that failure they are opening their own minds to the actuality of their loss and they are accepting that there is no alternative but to move on without it, wherever that ‘on’ might be.  That moving on – in itself – will hopefully bring them to a place of healing, a place where they can begin making amends to their discarded hearts.  When you have something of value and you deliberately trash it because of your deluded stupidity, please remember that you are destroying only your own peace of mind – not that of any other.  Understanding that actuality is where the word ‘accountability’ steps in.  And those ‘at a loss’ will be held accountable – every single one of them.

‘At a loss’ is at times a distinctly fiscal description.  For those shackled by the big bad world of finance, greed and ill-gotten gains – being ‘at a loss’ is terrifying news.  In the lives of those types, the prospect of watching the numbers that gave them ‘status’ and defined their very existence whittle themselves from billions down to nothing can cause immeasurable stress, coupled with a debilitating fear – and those diseases combined can have disastrous effects.  Usually – after hiding denial behind numerous lies, those ‘at a loss’ will start immediately their relentless search for ‘The Perpetrator of Their Misfortunes’ with a ‘no holds barred’ sort of blame-game.  Unable to accept that they are ultimately responsible for their own drastic ‘losses’ they will flail around trying to find a fall-guy on whom to pin their fall-out, a scapegoat on which to strap their parachutes.  Thereafter, when their fall-guy flies and their parachutes fail to open, they will descend into a state of chaotic desperation.  In that state, those types are dangerous.  They have sold their souls, i.e. their futures, and will attempt anything in order to restore the balance they imagine they had.  It is best to leave them to it.  Their wasted efforts expose them further and once totally exposed they will know to refrain from bitching and whining – which is a relief to us all.

Being ‘at a loss’ for words is not synonymous with being speechless.  It depends upon what your intentions are.  I choose to think that being wordless means that you in fact have a great deal to say, but in certain situations elect to stay silent because the people to whom you should direct certain words are a waste of the energy it would take to utter them.  Direct your energy wisely.  Those ‘at a loss’ will suffer, too, those protracted silences.  Like they will suffer the ‘speechlessness’ that comes with the realisation that the words they never heard cannot ever be respoken – no matter how often they try to read them out loud.  It’s all in the timing – and that is not the first time I have said that.  Incidentally – those self-same words will not be heard, now, either – no matter which ears the speechless think their ‘right’ words might reach.  It’s all in the tone of the say-so and the nature of the hearing ears.  The say-so of the speechless, sadly, has no resonance and resonance – like Love – is not a commodity, no matter what your fiscal description.

 

 

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